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27

Mar

We’ve packed up the mobile cabin and moved to Blogger, see you over there!
untroddenview.blogspot.com

We’ve packed up the mobile cabin and moved to Blogger, see you over there!


untroddenview.blogspot.com

21

Feb

ROOF TREES
I had an argument discussion with my Mother in a restaurant after my graduation last week (I’d had to give the Harry Potter robes and silly hat back so I felt disgruntled instead of swishy) about rural development. She challenged me to convince her that a few acres of new housing wouldn’t damage the visual, social and environmental qualities of the very rural area she lives in (so middle-of-nowhere, there’s cows on one side and horses on the other and it’s almost impossible to find the house at night in the deep, dark, absence of light pollution). Amongst my stream of sort-of-intelligent, impassioned defiance, was my point that small, single storey, low density housing with green roofs would still look like a field at first glance and an adorable hobbit community at second glance. Mother replied with an ‘agree to disagree’ expression, but I know she was secretly dreaming about a cabin with little trees on the roof and a vegetable patch and a pony and a pygmy goat herd…

ROOF TREES


I had an argument discussion with my Mother in a restaurant after my graduation last week (I’d had to give the Harry Potter robes and silly hat back so I felt disgruntled instead of swishy) about rural development. She challenged me to convince her that a few acres of new housing wouldn’t damage the visual, social and environmental qualities of the very rural area she lives in (so middle-of-nowhere, there’s cows on one side and horses on the other and it’s almost impossible to find the house at night in the deep, dark, absence of light pollution). Amongst my stream of sort-of-intelligent, impassioned defiance, was my point that small, single storey, low density housing with green roofs would still look like a field at first glance and an adorable hobbit community at second glance. Mother replied with an ‘agree to disagree’ expression, but I know she was secretly dreaming about a cabin with little trees on the roof and a vegetable patch and a pony and a pygmy goat herd…

Anywhere nice absolutely teeming with arseholes

It’s a satirical article but seriously; rural areas are becoming overrun with symbols of ignorance. It’s a real shame that the next generation in rural families probably won’t be able to find a suitable job or afford a house in the area they grew up in, because the only houses being built are giant mansions (understandable from a developer’s point of view, since large detached homes with outbuildings are the most desirable, according to research by The Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyers) and everyone works from home or commutes to a city.This is not a new problem; ‘House prices freeze out rural families' was a headline in 2002.

I’m not at all opposed to development in rural areas - poor quality land should by all means be sensibly and sensitively redeveloped - but this development is too often based on a romanticised view of a simpler rural life (This Is Money blames Hugh Fearless-lyEatsAll) and a need for vast amounts of private space, in the form of five spare bedrooms and ten acres of empty land.

No one should move to a new area without awareness of the reality of living there, whether it’s moving to a rural area and refusing to support the village shop or moving to a thriving inner city area and complaining about the noise from the pub next door.

31

Jan

Further to my earlier post; SHETLAND PONIES IN CARDIGANS.

Further to my earlier post; SHETLAND PONIES IN CARDIGANS.

'Good artists tend to be bad students'

I’m hoping this is true (it probably is, I think Peter Schjeldahl knows what he’s talking about) as I’ve just decided to take a break from my Masters for a year. Hopefully soon I’ll be feeling better and reading/seeing/learning more. When I am, I’ll most likely be here, trying my best to entertain with my discoveries.

03

Jan

Eyvind Earle

02

Jan

Dan Phillips did a TED talk in 2010, it’s moderately inspiring.

Our housing has become a commodity, and it takes a little bit of nerve to dive in to those primal, terrifying parts of ourselves, and make our own decisions

Dan Phillips (my new favourite person) helps build affordable homes with/for people, using around 75% recycled materials; upcycling in a useful and charming way (rather than a falling-in-to-a-hideous-hole-on-Etsy way).

29

Dec

pasture rd.: Living in small spaces.

pasturerd:

Living in a tiny cabin is fantastic most of the time, but you have to be careful. You have to clean and tidy up and straighten out almost constantly or things can go from ok to “oh my god why do we live like this we are disgusting hoarders is that a flat cat?!! noooo!” very quickly.

This sums up my fears about living in a tiny cabin; I really like ‘stuff’ and have to be in the right mood to tidy. Right now I’m sat on my bed with my laptop at the very edge of my desk because the rest of the desk has been covered in sweet wrappers, knitting, letters, stationary etc for 4 days and I’m too lazy to tidy it.

gardensinunexpectedplaces:


Via steveleathers:


For PARK(ing) Day, my company created an Urban Farmlet on SW 2nd Street in Portland (between Taylor and Yamhill). 
It’s only two parking spots, but it feels like a lot more. If you’re in the area, come by and check it out. Have some lemonade. Enjoy some space that you normally wouldn’t have the chance to.


Happy 2011 PARK(ing) Day, y’all. 


PARK(ing) Day is an annual, worldwide event that invites citizens everywhere to transform metered parking spots into temporary parks for the public good.


Click here to view a map of cities where residents have set up pop-up parks.

gardensinunexpectedplaces:

Via steveleathers:

For PARK(ing) Day, my company created an Urban Farmlet on SW 2nd Street in Portland (between Taylor and Yamhill). 

It’s only two parking spots, but it feels like a lot more. If you’re in the area, come by and check it out. Have some lemonade. Enjoy some space that you normally wouldn’t have the chance to.

Happy 2011 PARK(ing) Day, y’all. 

PARK(ing) Day is an annual, worldwide event that invites citizens everywhere to transform metered parking spots into temporary parks for the public good.

Click here to view a map of cities where residents have set up pop-up parks.